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April 20 2017

April 19 2017

Repair Cafe this Sunday!

Repair Cafe

It’s that time again for another Repair Cafe! In partnership with TransitionKW, we’re hosting another event this Sunday, April 23rd from noon until 4pm.

DON’T THROW YOUR BROKEN STUFF AWAY! Bring in your busted items and we’ll try and help you fix it (FOR FREE)! In the past we’ve done electronics, appliances, furniture, toys, clothing and more. Free coffee and munchies will be provided!

Register for Repairs!

If you’ve got something you’d like us to have a look at, please fill out a reservation using the Eventbrite link below:

RESERVE YOUR REPAIR SLOT

By registering ahead of time, we can ensure someone will be on hand to help you with your item!

See you there!

The post Repair Cafe this Sunday! appeared first on KwartzLab Makerspace.

April 14 2017

April 22nd: All-Day CryptoParty

April 13 2017

Representative Town Halls: Make Your Voice Heard!

The House and Senate are in recess, which means it is time for our representatives to come home and meet with their constituents.

Both of our California Senators have town halls coming up. Join us in making our voices heard by showing up in person with your questions ready:

  • Senator Feinstein Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Thurs, Apr 20th @ 11:00AM
  • Senator Harris Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Fri, Apr 21st @ 3:30PM

As for the House, here at CRASH Space our local representative is Congresswoman Bass. She does not currently have a town hall scheduled, but she does have a relevant event:
From Nixon to Trump: Perspectives on Presidential Accountability. Wed, Apr 19th @ 6:30PM

Kudos to Congresswoman Bass for being the only one of our representatives to choose a meeting time that is outside of daytime working hours.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

April 12 2017

Get Your Tickets for the 2017 Interactive Show!

April 11 2017

Tuesday Sweep: 11 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Topics this week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

April 04 2017

Tuesday Sweep: 4 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Only 6 topics this week:

  • Hack-a-Day won April Fools as far as I’m concerned.
  • Brilliant idea of the week! Everyone should encrypt their email by knitting their messages into scarves and sending them via snail mail. Kniterate, a digital knitting machine based on OpenKnit, is the project to make it happen. Whose with me? Anyone anyone? Well, the Kickstarter is cool.
  • You know what’s better than this weekly post? SANS newsletters.  The @Risk one last week highlighted the same Ars Technica article on Symantec that I picked out, so I might be a bit biased.  However, for those of you trying to come up with a good recommendation for those who aren’t so tech savvy “OUCH” their newsletter for the common-user might be just the ticket.
  • Issue of the week: Symantec’s Stamp Tramp behavior for issuing https certificates makes them a persona non-gratta with private researchers and Google via Ars Technica (not for the first time)
  • Fresh off the Press from Krebs on Security: The Taylor Huddleston story.  When is a software programmer criminally liable for the behavior of their users?
  • In the don’t freak out, but appreciate how clever the monkeys are category of exploits – Using sound to hijack devices with accelerometers is insane, clever, and how can this be a burning man art project this year???
  • Who knew? The cryptography literature has an extended universe with recurring characters and everything. I’m totally charmed.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

April 03 2017

Interactive Show CFP deadline is May 1st

April 01 2017

Sonoff smart wifi switch

Bob found these ESP8266 based Wi-Fi Relays from china, the “Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch For MQTT COAP Smart Home” and being that he is is kind of a geek he bought some, now in typical China fashion the difference between 3 and 5 was not all that much, so he got two extra for me to glance over.

Please remove mains from the unit if you are looking at the unit! this is not a Class II device and 230 VAC is present on both sides of the PCB.

UART pinout

UART pinout

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" />

Sonoff is a WiFi wireless switch that can connect to appliance of different types and brands. Sonoff sends data to cloud platform through the WiFi Router, which enables you to remotely control all appliances with the App eWeLink on your smartphone.

The manufactures specification is as such:

  • Voltage range: 90-250v AC(50/60Hz)
  • Max current: 10A
  • Max Wattage: 2200 watts
  • Dimensions: (L)88*(W)38*(H)23mm
  • Color: White
  • Humidity: 5%-95%
  • Wireless Frequency: 2.4Ghz
  • Working Temp: ﹣20℃-75℃

Now the eagle eyed among you will have spotted the lack of CE or FCC marks anywhere on this! a quick look at the user guide also fails to mention any form of compliance.


So without much more waiting around let us have a look at the product.

ESP8266

The ESP8266 module is on the PCB, however does not seem to have any details of an FCC number, so is may not be a pre approved module, however they do make it easy to get to the UART.

UART pinout

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" class="size-full wp-image-12752" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?resize=229%2C153&ssl=1" alt="UART pinout" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?w=229&ssl=1 229w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w" sizes="(max-width: 229px) 100vw, 229px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

UART pinout

Relay

Looking at the main components on the board, the relay shows us that it is part number HRS3FNH-S-DC5V-A

This particular part number does not appear to have an English data sheet available, so lets glance over one in Chinese (using the bits gleaned from Aliexpress for a different model as a reference).

  • HRS3FN – Model
  • H – High Sensitivity 200mW coil.
  • DC5V – Coil Voltage
  • A – Contact form (A or C) this claims that the Contact is rated for 10 A @ 250 VAC.

Mains Connectors

Screw connectors on Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch

There are two 5mm Pitch mains terminals on the PCB, These should be rated to the same or greater current as the box tells me it is rated for, so these should be safe for use with 10 A @ 230 VAC (the box also states 2.2 kW). Breaking out a bit of random scrap mains wire, I am going to make a test probe for these terminals:


Looking at the screw terminals a bit more, they look a lot like these Screw Terminal (5mm) from SparkFun (and other sellers). These screw terminals fail the strand test above, and the data sheet rates them for 8 A…

PCB Board

The layout is nice and tight, but is it too tight! the gap between Live and Neutral is a bit tight, I think it is safe to say that I feel it is a bit too close, The requirement for creepage distance between Live and Neutral before any fusing is a minimum of 2.4mm; there is no fusing on this PCB at all.

Emissions

Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Live Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Live Side

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Neutral Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Neutral Side

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

If you read the post about the HLK-PM01 you will know why I am using BS EN 55032 and not BS EN 55022 (CISPA 32 and CISPA 22), if not, its because BS EN 55022:2010 was Withdrawn on 05 March 2017, and replaced with BS EN 55032:2012, and CISPA 32 doesn’t have quite the same get out clauses as CISPA 22 did:

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 4

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?fit=300%2C87&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?fit=676%2C197&ssl=1" class="size-large wp-image-12728" src="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=676%2C197&ssl=1" alt="BS EN 55032:2015 Section 4" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=1024%2C298&ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=150%2C44&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=300%2C87&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=768%2C223&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=945%2C275&ssl=1 945w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=600%2C175&ssl=1 600w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?w=1272&ssl=1 1272w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 4

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 7

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?fit=300%2C102&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?fit=676%2C229&ssl=1" class="size-large wp-image-12727" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=676%2C229&ssl=1" alt="BS EN 55032:2015 Section 7" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=1024%2C347&ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=150%2C51&ssl=1 150w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=300%2C102&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=768%2C260&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=945%2C320&ssl=1 945w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=600%2C203&ssl=1 600w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?w=1258&ssl=1 1258w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 7

As we can see from the graphs above, its a fail on Conducted Emissions (Live Side has measurements, neutral didn’t. However they are very smiler). however on the other scans its a pass.

All in all, from a unit point of view, it is an interesting unit that I may be tempted to use (Fused at 5A), HOWEVER it does not meet the requirements of relevant standards, it is not electrically safe. It would be illegal to place this unit as is on the market within the European Union.

If you are making a product that users are required to wire it in or plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a result!

Revisiting the HLK-PM01

A while ago I looked at the HLK-PM01, and amazingly it turned into a very well read post… (do not even touch the cheaper crap!) with a lot of people asking how to make it work properly.

Hi-Link’s solution for RF emission of a device using a HLK-PM01

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?fit=300%2C122&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?fit=676%2C276&ssl=1" class="size-medium wp-image-12438" src="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=300%2C122&ssl=1" alt="Hi-Link's solution for RF emission of a device using a HLK-PM01" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=300%2C122&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=150%2C61&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=768%2C313&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=945%2C385&ssl=1 945w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?resize=600%2C245&ssl=1 600w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/factory.png?w=981&ssl=1 981w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Hi-Link’s solution for RF emission of a device using a HLK-PM01

I also got an email from Tom at smart-sense.hr saying that he had used one of the HLK-PM01 modules, and his emission graphs were similar to the ones I produced in the last post. He had also been in contact with people at Hi-Link, the manufacturer who sent him the following solution.

I don’t have any 10 mH chokes (Well I probably do, I just have no idea which ones they are) however I have some 20 mH chokes, and a Schaffner RN102-0.6/02 which is 2 x 4.4 mH chokes in common mode (Farnell number 2097049).

I don’t use Inductors all that much as a component that I spec by value, but on paper Serial and Parallel Inductors behave nicely, so lets have a look at doing that:

Schematics for Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?fit=300%2C97&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?fit=676%2C218&ssl=1" class="wp-image-12048 size-full" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=676%2C218&ssl=1" alt="Possible solution for using an HLK-PM01 with 4.4 mH common mode choke" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?w=996&ssl=1 996w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=150%2C48&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=300%2C97&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=768%2C248&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=945%2C305&ssl=1 945w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter1.png?resize=600%2C193&ssl=1 600w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Possible solution for using an HLK-PM01 with 4.4 mH common mode choke

 

At work we have two LCR meters, a Wayne Kerr B424/N and an Sourcetronic ST2830 (ST2830 LCR Meter Manual), so setting the RN102-0.6-02 up to each of them in a number of configurations I managed to get some values (easer than the maths, and less likely to be wrong):

RN102-0.6/02 - 2 x 4.4 mH

RN102-0.6/02 – 2 x 4.4 mH

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wayne Kerr B424/N

Wayne Kerr B424/N

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Sourcetronic ST2830

Sourcetronic ST2830

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.47.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.47.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.37.58.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.37.58.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.30.11.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.30.11.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />

 

Wayne Kerr Meter B424/N Sourcetronic ST2830 LCR Meter

A. One Inductor only (Both Inductors give similar results)

5.39 mH 7.59 mH

B. Both inductors at one end

73 μH 50.82 μH

C. Both inductors diagonally

23.9 mH 27.24 mH

D. Both inductors in parallel

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/D-done-propper.png?fit=168%2C195&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/D-done-propper.png?fit=168%2C195&ssl=1" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-12498" src="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/D-done-propper.png?resize=129%2C150&ssl=1" alt="D. Both inductors in parallel" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/D-done-propper.png?resize=129%2C150&ssl=1 129w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/D-done-propper.png?w=168&ssl=1 168w" sizes="(max-width: 129px) 100vw, 129px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

D. Both inductors in parallel

6.51 mH 8.75 mH

E. Both inductors in parallel, one reversed.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/E.png?fit=168%2C195&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/E.png?fit=168%2C195&ssl=1" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-12464" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/E.png?resize=129%2C150&ssl=1" alt="E. Both inductors in parallel, one reversed." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/E.png?resize=129%2C150&ssl=1 129w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/E.png?w=168&ssl=1 168w" sizes="(max-width: 129px) 100vw, 129px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

E. Both inductors in parallel, one reversed.

27 μH 12.78 μH

Well there goes that cunning plan…

It turns out that if you put two inductors in series, that while yes you double the turns, and double the inductance, this only works if you are not doubling the turns on the same core! just doubling the turns on a core quadruples the inductance, as we can see from above.

Lucky for me, I had a Schaffner RN114-1.2-02 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A laying around, so I will use one side of that.

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=300%2C100&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=676%2C226&ssl=1" />
Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=300%2C203&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=676%2C457&ssl=1" />

Looking back at the original results, which were performed with the following setup. We can see that it is only the conducted emission we have to try and win back:

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Radiated Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Radiated Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

So lets look at the results using Filter 1:

HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Live Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Live Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Neutral Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Neutral Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

As you can see while there is some improvement of the Live conductor however the Neutral conductor still lets the circuit down. unlike last time I am not looking at the Class A limit lines due to BS EN 55022 “Information technology equipment. Radio disturbance characteristics. Limits and methods of measurement” [pdf] no longer being a current standard, and its replacement BS EN 55032:2015 “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” further restricts the get out clause for using Class A limits:

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 4

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?fit=300%2C87&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?fit=676%2C197&ssl=1" class="wp-image-12728 size-large" src="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=676%2C197&ssl=1" alt=" BS EN 55032:2015 "Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements" Section 4" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=1024%2C298&ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=150%2C44&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=300%2C87&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=768%2C223&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=945%2C275&ssl=1 945w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?resize=600%2C175&ssl=1 600w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032-S4.png?w=1272&ssl=1 1272w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

BS EN 55032:2015 “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” Section 4

BS EN 55032:2015 Section 7

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?fit=300%2C102&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?fit=676%2C229&ssl=1" class="wp-image-12727 size-large" src="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=676%2C229&ssl=1" alt=" BS EN 55032:2015 "Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements" Section 7" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=1024%2C347&ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=150%2C51&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=300%2C102&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=768%2C260&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=945%2C320&ssl=1 945w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?resize=600%2C203&ssl=1 600w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/bs-en-55032.png?w=1258&ssl=1 1258w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

BS EN 55032:2015 “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” Section 7

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=300%2C159&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=676%2C358&ssl=1" class="wp-image-12049 size-medium" src="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=300%2C159&ssl=1" alt="Filter two" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=300%2C159&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=150%2C80&ssl=1 150w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=768%2C407&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=945%2C501&ssl=1 945w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?resize=600%2C318&ssl=1 600w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?w=996&ssl=1 996w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Filter two

However also in Tom’s email was a solution that he had come up with that has slightly more components (And lucky for me the RN102-0.6-02 is the correct component):

Building it up out of components and wire I had laying around, I think it goes without saying that I can do daft things because I know what I am doing, but here it goes anyway. Please don’t use this size of wire when you do anything like this!

This is a common mode filter, any common mode noise should be removed by the choke, the additional capacitance (and ground wiring) should help to take out differential mode noise. lets see how it goes…

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=300%2C159&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=676%2C358&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

HLK-PM01 – Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

Ok so the results from testing:

Some how I have managed to kill the HLK-PM01, as I don’t trust the results I have got from the Neutral line scan, however the live side scan does show a close pass to Class B limits.

While I would not be happy using this Switched mode PSU to make anything I was going to place on the market, I may consider it!

If you are making a product that users are required to plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a pass! and as the Irish or welsh would say “Well sir, if I were you, I wouldn’t start from here” I would go with something like a VIGORTRONIX VTX-214-005-105 AC/DC PCB Mount Power Supply (Farnell #2401040 ), as for only a few quid more you win a switch mode PSU that stands a chance of not requiring external components to pass Class B!

March 28 2017

Tuesday Sweep: 28 March, 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

What does 89p get you? Autopsy of a Chinese phone charger

Every so often we see on line storeys of fake chargers burning down houses, and electric shocks. Normally these chargers are refereed to as ‘Apple’ or ‘iPhone’ chargers, however that is just because the small triangle chargers (in a variety of colours) are so prevalent. An official Apple 5W USB Power Adapter (link).

A while ago (pre Britex referendum) I bought a 89p phone charger (with free shipping) from Ali express (link to a 96p one), just to see how ‘good’ it is, lets just say that you wont be surprised by any of this:

The Phone charger is a BS1363 ish plug, so testing it is easer than testing either the HLK-PM01 or the cheap Chinese crap one (And yes I know I promised to revisit the HLK-PM01 to try and get a fix).

Having a quick go at checking to see how well it conforms to BS EN 55032:2015 – “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” (until the beginning of this month I would have considered BS EN 55022 [pdf]), It will have to comply to the Class B (Residential / Domestic) limit lines for conducted and radiated emissions

Conducted Emissions testing give us these results:

Conducted emissions from a cheap Chinese charger – Live Side (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load).

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" class="size-full wp-image-12515" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?resize=676%2C508&ssl=1" alt="Conducted emissions from a cheap Chinese charger - Live Side (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load)." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?w=799&ssl=1 799w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?resize=150%2C113&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?resize=768%2C577&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph1.png?resize=600%2C451&ssl=1 600w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Conducted emissions from a cheap Chinese charger – Live Side (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load).

Radiated Emissions testing give us these results:

Radiated emissions from a cheap Chinese charger – Orientation One (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load).

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" class="size-full wp-image-12516" src="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?resize=676%2C508&ssl=1" alt="Radiated emissions from a cheap Chinese charger - Orientation One (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load)." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?w=799&ssl=1 799w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?resize=150%2C113&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?resize=768%2C577&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/graph2.png?resize=600%2C451&ssl=1 600w" sizes="(max-width: 676px) 100vw, 676px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Radiated emissions from a cheap Chinese charger – Orientation One (powering a representative 33 ohm resistive load).

Looking at these two graphs, you can see that while the radiated emissions are fine, it fails to meet the requirements of the conducted emissions (Blue squares below the red line, green circles below the blue line). now we know its not permissible to place the charger on the market in the EU (including the UK) from an emissions point of view. We can now assess its electrical safety.

So lets look at what happens when we perform a quick LVD screen test

The results for the LVD screen test:

  • Offload DC out 5.3 V
  • DC maximum output before supply folded ~1 A
  • Power used – 3 W off load, 8 W @ 1 A
  • Earth Pin is ok, however spacing issues with Live and Neutral
  • Fails a breakdown test 600 Vac @ 1 mA (does not recover).
  • No secondary securing of internal primary wire to pins, or PCB.
  • Single insulation mains in contact with LV / Secondary side.
  • No physical barrier between Pins and PCB
  • Capacitor between Primary and Secondary circuits is not Y rated.
  • Separation between Primary and Secondary does not meet requirements.
  • No mains fuse fitted
  • Solder on rear of pins in physical contact with capacitor on secondary side.
  • No Class II symbol on regulatory markings

I am sure it is safe to say that I was not surprised by the lack of conformity of the charger, I was however surprised at just how terrible it was!

I have had a number of iPhones over the years, and as such I have two real iPhone Chargers laying around, have a look at the markings on these two:

March 26 2017

Laser cut Fractal Puzzle

March 24 2017

Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts

Part of our makerspace access system involves an Arduino and an ESP8266. Mostly it works just fine, but every now and again the Arudino seems to lock up and stop working. Various attempts have been made to stop this happening, but so far to no avail. Leaving a laptop connected to the Arduino’s serial port for debugging wasn’t happening because it happens quite infrequently and no-one had a spare laptop to leave lying around.

Enter the OpenLog! You can buy OpenLog boards for just over £10 (less if you are willing to pay the China-wait-for-delivery-tarrif) but where’s the fun in that? I remembered that I had an SD card reader breakout board languishing unused in a drawer (it came with my 3d printer kit and I’ve never gotten round to fitting it). And who doesn’t have some random Arduino boards lying around? It should be simple to make one right? right?

Nothing is ever quite so simple….

The Hardware

My first thought was that I’d need a 3.3V Arduino, because SD cards all run on 3.3V. Of course the Pro-Minis that I had were 5V; curses! Okay so I’ll need a level shifter as well but at least I have those. But wait! This SD card reader module is designed to connect to a RAMPS board that’s on an Arduino Mega and those things run at 5V…. On closer inspection the SD card reader module has a 74hc4050d IC on board, a quick bit of googling reveals that is a level shifter. Good, so I can use the 5V Pro Mini I have and the SD card reader module, but no need for another little board with a level shifter on.

IC1 is the level-shifter

Next problem, none of the pins on the SD card reader module are labelled! I could check the RAMPS pinout, but that’s somewhat confusing because the connector on the RAMPS has 8 pins and my module has 12. After a lot of scrolling through Google images I finally found one that looks to be the same and has the pinout at this link, so it’s an HCMODU0044.

Time to do some spaghetti wiring. Connect GND and 5V to, er, GND and 5V on the Pro Mini. Connect up SCK, SO and SI from the card reader to SCK (pin 13), MISO (pin 12) and MOSI (pin 11) on the Pro Mini. CS, what to do with that? Reading the main OpenLog sketch from their github repo, there is a handy define that SD_CHIP_SELECT is pin 10. That’s probably CS then, makes sense using pins 10-13.

Finally take a random LED and 22ohm resistor from the makerspace electronic parts stock and connect it to the other GND and pin 5.  This will be the status LED.

The Software

My plan here was to download the code from github and flash it.  Job done.  Nope, too simple!  It seems that the latest code (at the time of writing) doesn’t actually build.  Eventually I stumbled across this page which, as well being a good overview of using OpenLog, also contains a button to “Download OpenLog Firmware Bundle” about half way down the page.

This code compiled “better” than the latest from github, but still failed.  Downloading the latest Serial Port library, as directed on the OpenLog page and I finally had a version of the code that would compile.  This was using Arduino 1.6.8, the OpenLog page indicated they were using 1.6.5, so I suspect some incompatibilities have been introduced somewhere along the way.

Testing the OpenLog board using an FTDI lead and the Arudino serial console resulted in the text I typed ending up in a file on the SD card! Hurrah!

Final Thoughts

It had taken me maybe an hour to wire up and program, but that was after a couple of failed starts and a fair bit of rummaging around on the internet beforehand.  It seems like a useful debugging tool to have in your box of tricks, I’m not sure why I’ve never bought or put one together before.  It would be nice to build it onto a little PCB to tidy up the wiring, but that’s a project for another day….

Has it helped to fix the problem with the makerspace access control system?  We don’t know yet….

The post Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts appeared first on Swindon Makerspace.

March 22 2017

The 8th Annual Interactive Show: Call For Projects

March 21 2017

Tuesday Sweep: 21 Mar 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

Hivelord at the Barnes STEAM Fair

 

The Hivelord made an appearance at the STEAM Fair at the Barnes, in his new business friendly attire, along with Hive76 members Chris Terrell and Mike Barretta! In case you didn’t know, STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics, ie all the good stuff. Mike was there to entice visitors into the STEAM lifestyle with his custom portable gaming machines based on the Raspberry Pi and emulationstation, while the Hivelord took photos of unwitting participants using his face, and thus stealing a tiny portion of their soul (as it is told in The Legends). Click the link below to see the photos from the Barnes!

-> Click here to see the Hivelord’s Photos from this event! <-

 

Bolts and other fixings in Fusion 360

I have been playing about with Fusion 360, one of thrings you will need to include before very long is a fixing, even if you can 3D print everything in your design at some point you will want to stick two parts together at which point you will need a bolt or a screw. 

This took me a while to find in Fusion 360 as it is not a work flow that instantly jumped out as how it would work. I also for a fair while thought about drawing my own bolts, but I reasoned that someone else must have done the drawings first. 

March 20 2017

How I make a Screencast

I have been playing with Fusion 360 again… and as part of that I have been finding cunning tricks that I am thankful that I now know. Since I think I have a blog or something, I shall share those I find to be useful.

And for this I shall use the medium of interpretive dance Screencast.

I found a useful tool called ScreencastMaker (Mac Appstore) that does the capture part, the glue is then Keynotes, and iMovie:

March 16 2017

Culver City Police Deparment Community Forum on Immigration Enforcement: Watch Online

We attended this event as a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Chief Brixby of the Culver City Police Department held a community forum tonight and spoke on CCPD’s role in immigration enforcement. Chief Brixby takes the time to answer community questions, and addresses the “ACLU’s 9 “Model” State and Local Law Enforcement Policies and Rules.”

“I hear you saying that immigration law enforcement is not the primary, secondary, or tertiary function of the Culver City Police Department.
I hear you saying that sanctuary status, from what you understand […] would not prevent the CCPD from enforcing the law here in Culver City.
I hear you saying that you are already in compliance with the ACLU 9 Model Principles. Is that correct?”
– An audience member

“That is correct.” – Culver City Police Chief Bixby

For more local Culver City events on the Culver City Community Calendar. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

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